How To Sew A Lined Stocking for Christmas

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Handmade Christmas stockings add an extra special touch to the Christmas season. Add country charm to your farmhouse and learn how to sew a lined stocking for Christmas.

How to sew a lined stocking

Christmas this year is extra special for our family. Not only is it Ila’s first Christmas, but she was born just a few days after Christmas so we will be celebrating her first year of life! We are so excited and grateful for this season of life we are in and to get to celebrate it during such a cozy time of year.

This year, however, we are not in our own home. While I am a little bummed to not have our white farmhouse built and ready to deck out in red and white country Christmas décor, we are so blessed to be building our dream farmhouse on our dream property and to celebrate this time with family.

To make this year special for Ila and our family, one thing we did was plan out décor that fits in our limited space but still reflects our family traditions. We started with all new stockings for Christmas.

I love how these turned out. We wanted to keep it country and farmhouse style but add pops of color all while coordinating everyone’s stockings and I think we hit the nail on the head.

These lined stockings are made out of red and green cotton paired with basic drop cloth that gives the feel of old grain sack fabric. I plan to also add our names but embroidering is still new and takes a lot of time and patience so I have not quite gotten that far on these yet.

We chose to match the boys by using green and the girls by using red. Ila’s is full red cotton to stand out while the adults are drop cloth with the matching fabric as the cuff.

Fabric Choices

While we chose a traditional color scheme and classic, country style, this is still a simple and easy stocking to make. You could pair any fabrics together and it would reflect your style perfectly.

If you like a more modern style, maybe opt for a neutral color palette, color blocking, or a modern printed fabric. You could even deck these out with Christmas themed fabrics to go all out for a more traditional Christmas.

I chose to keep it somewhere in between with simple patterns but in traditional Christmas colors. This is paired with drop cloth to give that old farmhouse feel of a grain sack.

Simple Christmas Stockings

Despite having to sew curves, this is a very easy project. It is perfect for a beginner sewer. Use an old stocking as a pattern to get the shape and it is a matter of four seams.

Add a liner as shown in this tutorial to take the stocking up a notch. It is still easy for a beginner to work through but adds a professional looking touch.

If you have a serger, try serging any seam edges to polish off the stocking. If not, try zigzagging those same edges for the same effect. These details are what takes a project to the next level and helps the stocking to last for years to come!

Tips For How to Sew a Lined Stocking

  • Serge or zig zag stitch the edges of every seam to give a more professional look and to help with quality. This will help the stockings to last longer and look nicer.
  • Try using coordinating fabrics for a fun look!
  • Use an old stocking as a pattern

How to Sew a Lined Stocking Materials

stocking, fabric and bias tape for lined stocking

1/2-1 yard Fabric A– Drop Cloth
1/2-1 yard Fabric B- Patterned
Thread
Sewing Machine
Old Stocking
Scissors
Serger (Optional)

Choose which fabric you want to be the outside of the stocking, cuff and lining of the stocking. This will determine how much you need of each fabric. 1/2 yard is sufficient for just one of the stocking pieces. So for example on our stocking, I used the drop cloth as the main stocking fabric and the lining fabric and need 1 yard. In the drop cloth I linked, you get much more than 1 yard. Otherwise, 1/2 yard is sufficient.

Cut List for Lined Stocking

pieces cut for lined stocking

2- Stocking Pieces (J shape) in main fabric (fabric A) with seam allowance.

2- Stocking Pieces (J shape) in lining fabric (I also used fabric A but this could also be fabric B for you) with seam allowance.

1- rectangle cuff piece. Mine was 9 inches by 15 inches but depending on your stocking, it may need to be bigger or smaller.

1- 9 inch long piece of bias tape

How to Sew a Lined Stocking for Christmas

1. Cut out all pieces

For the four stocking pieces (both main fabric and lining fabric), unfold the stocking of your old pattern stocking. Lay your stocking onto the fabric, lining up the edge of the fabric with the top of the main piece of the stocking. Move the stocking down to allow for about 1/2 inch seam allowance.

Cut around the shape of the stocking leaving a 1/2 inch seam allowance the entire way around. I like to double up the fabric to cut one for two pieces of the stocking. Cut four total pieces (two for the outside and two for the lining).

Determine how big your cuff needs to be by measuring the pattern cuff, then adding 1/2 inch (1 inch total) on each end for seam allowance. This is the length. For the width, I wanted mine about 4 inches wide. Double that and add 1 inch for seam allowance. This meant mine would be 9 inches. This made a 9 x 15 inch rectangle for mine.

2. Sew Main Stocking Pieces

With right sides together, sew a seam about 1/2 inch in around the edge of your two stocking pieces. Leave the short, top edge open. You are just sewing the “J” shape. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end of the seam. Trim down to help with bulk. If you choose to, serge or zig zag stitch around the edge of the seam you just made to help with fraying.

Repeat with your liner fabric.

3. Create Cuff

Fold your cuff piece in half lengthwise, with wrong sides together. Fold in half again, short side to short side with wrong sides together. Sew a straight seam down the short edge where the two sides meet. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end of the seam.

sew the cuff

4. Assemble Stocking

Turn the main stocking piece right side out. Place lining stocking piece inside of the main stocking piece wrong side out. This will mean that the two wrong sides of each stocking piece will be touching inside. The outside and inside should have both right sides showing. Straighten and lay the stocking flat with both pieces together.

Next, place cuff inside the stocking lining the top edge of the stocking up with the sewn edge of the cuff. The cuff piece should be right side out so that the right side touches the inside lining. If you look down into the stocking, you should see the wrong side with the seam.

Last, fold the bias tape in half to create a loop. Place the raw edges of the loop up and line up with the raw top edge of the stocking in between the cuff and the lining fabric. Pin all pieces in place.

assemble the stocking

5. Sew Stocking Together

Sew a straight seam around the top edge of the stocking with all four pieces getting caught in the seam. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end.

To help with bulk, alternate the seams of each piece. Flatten the main piece seam to the left, the lining to the right and again the left with the cuff.

6. Finish the Edges

Finish off any visible raw stitches with your serger or zig zag stitch on your sewing machine. Cut any loose threads.

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Pin for Later: How to Sew A Lined Stocking for Christmas

How to sew a lined stocking
Yield: 1 Stocking

How To Sew A Lined Stocking

How To Sew A Lined Stocking

Handmade Christmas stockings add an extra special touch to the Christmas season. Add country charm to your farmhouse and learn how to sew a lined stocking for Christmas.

Prep Time 15 minutes
Active Time 30 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Materials

  • 1/2-1 yard Fabric A- Drop Cloth
  • 1/2-1 yard Fabric B- Patterned
  • Thread
  • Old Stocking

Tools

  • Sewing Machine
  • Scissors
  • Serger (Optional)

Instructions

1. Cut out all pieces



For the four stocking pieces (both main fabric and lining fabric), unfold the stocking of your old pattern stocking. Lay your stocking onto the fabric, lining up the edge of the fabric with the top of the main piece of the stocking. Move the stocking down to allow for about 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Cut around the shape of the stocking leaving a 1/2 inch seam allowance the entire way around. I like to double up the fabric to cut one for two pieces of the stocking. Cut four total pieces (two for the outside and two for the lining).



Determine how big your cuff needs to be by measuring the pattern cuff, then adding 1/2 inch (1 inch total) on each end for seam allowance. This is the length. For the width, I wanted mine about 4 inches wide. Double that and add 1 inch for seam allowance. This meant mine would be 9 inches. This made a 9 x 15 inch rectangle for mine.



2. Sew Main Stocking Pieces



With right sides together, sew a seam about 1/2 inch in around the edge of your two stocking pieces. Leave the short, top edge open. You are just sewing the "J" shape. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end of the seam. Trim down to help with bulk. If you choose to, serge or zig zag stitch around the edge of the seam you just made to help with fraying.



Repeat with your liner fabric.

3. Create Cuff



Fold your cuff piece in half lengthwise, with wrong sides together. Fold in half again, short side to short side with wrong sides together. Sew a straight seam down the short edge where the two sides meet. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end of the seam.

4. Assemble Stocking



Turn the main stocking piece right side out. Place lining stocking piece inside of the main stocking piece wrong side out. This will mean that the two wrong sides of each stocking piece will be touching inside. The outside and inside should have both right sides showing. Straighten and lay the stocking flat with both pieces together.
Next, place cuff inside the stocking lining the top edge of the stocking up with the sewn edge of the cuff. The cuff piece should be right side out so that the right side touches the inside lining. If you look down into the stocking, you should see the wrong side with the seam.



Last, fold the bias tape in half to create a loop. Place the raw edges of the loop up and line up with the raw top edge of the stocking in between the cuff and the lining fabric. Pin all pieces in place.

5. Sew Stocking Together


Sew a straight seam around the top edge of the stocking with all four pieces getting caught in the seam. Be sure to back and forth stitch at the beginning and end.


To help with bulk, alternate the seams of each piece. Flatten the main piece seam to the left, the lining to the right and again the left with the cuff.



6. Finish the Edges



Finish off any visible raw stitches with your serger or zig zag stitch on your sewing machine. Cut any loose threads.

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